Tag Archives: Gold Finches

Birding with the Yangs

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These past few weeks, Yang and I have had some wonderful bird sightings, sometimes, literally, in our own back yard.  Case in point, one Friday, Natasha was meowing at the door all day. Then Rosalind was in the pantry window bird-chattering away, while I worked on my novel in the dining room.  I stopped and suddenly became aware that I’d been hearing a high-pitched hawkish call.  I got up and looked out the window in the dining room, and what did I see in the patch of sea roses, but two Merlins!  One flew away, while the other hung out for some time – before attacking a sparrow who out-smarted him.  I got these pictures through the window because I was afraid going outside would drive my visitor off.  Hence, it’s much blurrier than I’d like.  What do you think of this new guy?  I haven’t seen him since, but I did find an ominous splash of tiny white bird feathers on the nearby back porch.
Our bird feeders have returned to us the usual suspects.  Lots of Titmice and some Chickadees battle four pushy Blue Jays.  We also have two male and one female Cardinal  visiting.  One of the males is pretty aggressive.  While he’s fine with the little birds, he’ll go after the Blue Jays and drive them off!  We also have Nuthatches, Downy Woodpeckers, Goldfinches wearing their winter buff, and even a Yellow-bellied Woodpecker.  One day, a Carolina Wren gave me such a scolding when I came too near the juniper bush!
On a visit with friends on the Cape, we came across one of my favorite, but rarely seen, birds.  At first, seeing the creature head on, I perceived a bird with a brownish head and chest with a white belly forming a “v” into the brown chest.  I claimed I’d never seen such a bird before, until he took flight and I saw the luscious blue.  Bluebirds! A good-sized flock of them!  I noted in my Peterson’s that Bluebirds are usually found year round in New England mainly on the Cape.  How appropriate!  The Bluebird was one of my “must see” birds for the year.  I still need to see an Indigo Bunting, a Piliated Woodpecker, and a Scarlet Tanager.  It’s probably too late in the year for the first and last, but I’m holding onto hope for that Pterodactyl-sized woodpecker.  The Bluebird photos are courtesy of Andrea Krammer.
Today, when we took a morning walk (about 7:00) on the Blackstone River Trail, we saw some interesting birds.  A Great Blue Heron and a black Cormorant were fishing in the same part of the river.  Then, atop a tall dead tree, we saw a bald eagle.  We watched as he sat there majestically for some time before he soared off away from us and the river. We didn’t have the means to get a picture, so I’m borrowing this one below.

I can’t wait to see what the remainder of the year brings!
Source eagle image:  https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Eagle_on_roots_-_crop_3_(430008061).jpg

 

Birds of Spring

 The other day I did a post on the birds of winter.  I still have enough pictures for a Part II; but, right now, let’s accentuate the springitive (so to speak). Many of my favorite warm weather birds have returned.  Even before the snow was gone in March, I caught this shot of a Robin in the Canadian Maple outside my window.  Apparently, the winters are warm enough that most Robins don’t go South for the winter, but stay in the deep woods up here.  Nevertheless, this was one of the first Robins I had seen in quite some time.  Our Robins are quite different from the blue and rust-colored English Robins.  As you can see, this guy is much bigger and is actually grey/black on top.

 

To me, of the first avian signs of spring is the return of my friend the Redwinged Blackbird.  He’s always at my feeder and showed up for the first time on 3/2.  I had a hard time catching him on film, but I did manage to sneak around the window and get a few pictures.  Yang helped as well.  I’ve also seen a female at the feeder, though I wasn’t able to get a picture of her.  So, it looks as if he brought the Missus.  Of course, there could be a whole bunch of different birds showing up, just one at a time.  Still, I like to think that he is my old-time buddy, as is his wife, who comes back every year to whistle in the spring with his trademark call.

 

 

 

 

 

My next favorite harbinger of spring is the Rosebreasted Grosbeak.  For years, I’ve seen either some females, a male, one year two males, or pairs. This year, I saw the female first.  Don’t you love the impish way she peaks through the window here?

Then, not many days later, the male showed up. He only would show me his back at first, the little stinker.  However, before long, I was able to get some shots of that rose breast for which he is known.  Isn’t the pink just like pure liquid color?  And the pristine white proves a gorgeous contrast to the rose and his black feathers. They both love the sunflower-seed hearts.  Already shelled, the seeds don’t require them to put their grosbeaks to work cracking.  I first saw them here on 5/4.  I hope they stay a few weeks.  Maybe they’ll nest and have baby grosbeaks?

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s two more shots of the Grosbeaks, just because they’re so fun to see.

 

My next favorite harbinger of spring is the Catbird.  They are so perky and intelligent. Many a time I’ve sat quietly by the fish pond and one has come over to drink, getting quite close to me. And they have so many delightful calls.  I believe they are related to the Mockingbird, so that would explain their extensive array of  vocalizations.  I think one reason that I’m partial to them is that one of their calls sounds like, “Sharon!”  My name.

They adore suet, so I play bird police and chase away the grackles and starlings when they try to hog the suet block.  Don’t you just love the sassy way Madame Catbird gives a little cock to her tail?

 

Another favorite pair are the House Finches.  They may occasionally show up in the winter, but I never see too many of them until spring.

 

 

 

All year round, we have Goldfinches.  In the winter, even the males turn a drab olive.  It was neat to watch them gradually change to a more brilliant color as the spring progressed. However, whatever their colors, neither male nor female Goldfinch will abandon our feeders – especially the ones with the sunflower hearts.  They are delightful old friends.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Speaking old friends, the Hairy Woodpeckers had a grand old time going after suet and sunflower seeds.  We also had many Downy Woodpeckers and, from time to time, Flickers and Redbellied Woodpeckers.  The Titmice, chickadees, Cardinals, and Nuthatches have kept us company year round as well.

So, it’s up to Yang and I to keep our avian friends up to their beaks in sunflower seeds and suet.

 

Late Summer Birds and Flora

 

Summer is almost officially past, so I’m posting some images from my gardens.  We have three kinds of morning glories flowering in our yard.  We’d have four, if the large blue ones would flower,garden1 but they won’t.  So, we have some deep purple, some magenta, and some orchid ones.  I don’t know all the names of the types, but they are lovely.  Every year, I collect the seeds from these flowers to replant them in the spring.  Sometimes, we get some interesting hybrids.  I managed to get pictures of one of my favorites.  Sometimes the orchid morning glories will sport a  broad, deep purple  stripe, as you see here. garden2 The seeds will actually reflect the  combined types.  Orchid seeds are cream colored and purple or magenta ones are black.  These hybrid seeds are usually cream with a black stripe.  Sometimes, the orchid ones will also blend with the magenta to produce a pink flower.  Unfortunately, I didn’t get a picture of the one pink flower I’ve seen so far, but I did tag the flower so that I can retrieve the seeds.

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The birds have also been having a grand time in our yard.  We’ve seen lots of cardinals, garden5including the Daddy Cardinal taking the kids out for dinner.  We also have Hairy and Downy Woodpeckers, scads of Gold Finches and Purple Finches, Chickadees, Titmice, and Nuthatches.  I even saw a hummingbird three times this year!  One time was in early September!  The young gentleman Coopers Hawks have since taken offhawk1 and rarely visit now.  We named them Shawn and Gus – I know you know that I AM telling the truth about that!  In this picture, you can see one hawk in the foreground and if you look carefully, the other is in silhouette in the triangle of railings on the right.
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The drought has certainly left my pumpkins gasping for life.  I’ve seen so many pumpkin and gourd embryos wither and die.  Still, some made it. garden10 Here is an odd shaped pumpkin, which some critter took a chunk out of.  Still, the pumpkin lives and now resides on my sideboard in the dining room.  The pumpkin below isn’t a rogue that needs to be caged to protect the other flora and fauna. The vine climbed over the garden fence and the pumpkin embryo became fertilized hanging over the outside of the garden.  Since we found evidence of some creature trying to dig into the garden,  we developed protective caging from milk cartons. garden7 The ploy worked, for this pumpkin matured and now resides in state on the what-not table in my parlor.  You can also see a crown of thorns embryo ready to flower and be fertilized.  The good news is that this little guy is happily growing away.  Maybe I’ll have some more pictures of it later.  garden9
Here are some of our eggplants and peppers. These guys were delicious!  Yang can cook!  So, I guess the drought didn’t totally blacken my green thumb.garden8